Plant Folklore broadside set resurrected

Posted by on May 3, 2011 in Drawing, News, Posters | No Comments
Singing Down Roots: Plant Folklore of the Sonoran Desertis a set of limited edition broad­sides origi­nally commis­sioned by the Arizona Humanities Council as part of a traveling exhibit on desert plants as charac­ters in oral tradi­tions of Southwestern Indian Tribes. Originally published in 1991, there are but a handful of these posters left.All are 22 x 35 inches, offset printed in duotone on cover weight Mohawk Superfine art paper.
These posters each feature a short essay by an expert from the culture depicted, about a plant character of their choice, along with a story, song or poem in both English and the native language, and a graphite pencil illus­tra­tion by Paul Mirocha.
Most of the expert consul­tants were members of the partic­ular culture that origi­nated the story or poem and each poster is a gem in its simplicity. Several of the writers have since passed away so these posters are little gems of history in themselves, now found only on this web site.
Please contact Paul to purchase a single poster for 20.00, or the whole exhibit set for 100.00, plus postage.
illustration of plantfolk agave Plant Folklore broadside set resurrected
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The Mescal Agave Talks Like That. Larry Evers and Felipe Molina, authors of Yaqui Deer Songs/​Maso Bwikam: A Native American Poetry (The University of Arizona Press), trans­late and comment on a text selected from the rich Yaqui tradi­tion of deer dance songs. Paul Mirocha’s drawing is of kuu’u, the mescal agave (Agave angus­ti­folia, wild ancestor of the tequila agave), in bloom.

 

illustration of plantfolk yuccabacatta Plant Folklore broadside set resurrected 
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 Yucca baccata: From the begin­ning. Mirocha’s drawing of igaiyé (Yucca bacatta) illus­trates a passage selected from the exten­sive Western Apache herbal lore and trans­lated by Gayle Potter-Basso, who also contributed a brief essay on this indis­pens­able plant.
illustration of plantfolk cholla Plant Folklore broadside set resurrected
Click poster for larger image.
 Coyote ate it and Really Laughed. It was a succu­lent pad of the prickly pear cactus that made Coyote laugh in this excerpt from the Cocopah tradi­tion, selected and annotated by Leanne Hinton. The Trickster changes his tune in this drawing of Coyote tricked into eating a mouthful of cholla, prickly pear’s thorny cousin.
illustration of plantfolk ocotillo Plant Folklore broadside set resurrected 
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I am the Ocotillo. Tohono-O’odham third-grader Sonya Ortega“s poem sets the tone for her teacher, Danny Lopez’s medita­tion on melhog, the versa­tile plant­that anglo residents of the Sonoran Desert sometimes call “buggy-whip cactus.” Paul Mirocha’s drawing of a spike of flowers atop the ocotillo’s long, thorny, leafless dry season branch­graces this poster.

illustration of plantfolk corn Plant Folklore broadside set resurrected
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The Corn Maiden’s Song.EMory Sekaquaptewa chose and trans­lated a song forQa’ökatsina–the Hopi Corn KAchina– as the point of depar­ture for his eluci­da­tion of teh spiri­tual nature of cor, teh rain that is its due, and the obstacle to the coming of rain that profane humans can call into being. Paul Mirocha’s drawing inter­prets the inter­con­nect­ed­ness of the plant, teh spirit, and the blessing of rain in a dry land.

illustration of plantfolk tobacco Plant Folklore broadside set resurrected
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The Tobacco Plant Has a Laugh. Uva–tobacco–is sacred to the Hualapai. As we see in teh story of Frog Girl Hanya’ Misi’, trans­lated by Elenora Mapatis and expanded upon by Lucille Watahomigie, the tobacco plant was not always a member of the vegetable kingdom. Paul Mirocha’s artwork weaves an inter­twined image of the scacred plant’s past and present forms.

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